Split (2016) – Honest Review

James McAvoy and M. Night Shyamalan team up to create a unique, gripping, and at times, terrifying horror film.

I had a bad feeling about Split when I learned of the involvement of BlumHouse, as the studio is very hit-or-miss in recent years, but Split has proved to be a certified hit, both at the box office and with audiences.

When James McAvoy’s performance is witnessed, it is not hard to see why this film is so highly regarded. Very few actors could do what he did in Split, he can switch seamlessly between characters in an almost chameleon-like state, and it is simply intoxicating to watch. At some points, you can actually see McAvoy losing himself to the character of the beast, perhaps shown most prominently in the build to the climax, which includes a highly intense and wholeheartedly creepy chase. It is a shame that the young Scotsman will likely not be remembered when Oscar season rolls around next year, because his performance here would not be out of place in any year’s Best Leading Actor category.

I particularly enjoyed the camerawork on display in this film, it really gives the viewer a sense of claustrophobia, a sense of real captivity, which allows audiences to sympathise further still with the three victims of the film.

Another area of greatness in Split is its script. M. Night Shyamalan has written something special with this one, cementing his rise from the depth of cinematic doom. It is arguable that his last film, The Visit, had more in the way of scares, but the concept behind Split is certainly one that gets you thinking, without overdoing it in the way of complexity. The film also deals with some real problems, psychological trauma, child abuse, and mental disorder, which is immensely effective in the emotive filmmaking process.

On a lighter note, the end scene and Bruce Willis cameo, implying a shared universe with Unbreakable, was Shyamalan’s own unique take on fan service, and the possibilities that may come with this are frankly mouth-watering.

There are problems with the film though, because even though I can praise the screenplay for its emotional effectiveness and thought provoking originality, Shyamalan still seems to have a little bit of trouble breaking bad habits. In this case, the heavy-handedness of his storytelling, this at times does rob the film of its class.

To conclude, Split is certainly one to see for horror fans, and for Unbreakable fans, who will not be left wanting after this spine-chiller gets its 23 pairs of hands on their psyche, and takes them on a disturbingly fractured journey, the likes of which Shyamalan has rarely achieved in his career.

I rate this film: 8/10   

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