Get Out (2017) – Honest Review

Believe the hype, Get Out is some serious next-level horror.

There’s a lot of critical praise heading the way of Jordan Peele’s directorial debut Get Out, and for good reason. Ever since trailers hit the media in 2016 I was highly anticipating its release as horror has seen somewhat of a resurgence as of late. Needless to say, Get Out did not leave me wanting.

My main praise goes to Jordan Peele, both his screenwriting and his direction are very much on point here, but the screenwriting more-so. The writing is witty, imaginative, and utterly terrifying, with many of the characters forming their own unique personalities as the narrative unfolds, which is a trait that has been crucial in the aforementioned horror resurgence of recent years. Characters are not even the strongest element of the screenplay; however, as that title falls upon the various plot twists we are subject to in the films second, and third acts. We are kept guessing for the most part, and each twist comes as a storyline-bombshell of epic proportions, tying into earlier narrative devices excellently.

As far as scares go, the film is more than satisfactory, acting as more of a spine-chiller than an out-and-out jump fest, which is another element that has shaped the genre revival in recent years. The Armitage family and their party guests are wildly unnerving, and the film so well conveys a sense impending doom and heavy imprisonment for the films protagonist Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), so much so that the audience is as powerless as he is to avoid the stomach churning nervous-fear that the film will be so fondly remembered for.

The film is responsible for some good performances too, the previously mentioned Daniel Kaluuya can play both a helpless victim and an underdog hero incredibly well, and what’s even better is his ability to switch seamlessly between the two. LiRel Howery is also excellent as Chris’ best friend Rod, who provides a lot of the witty, and much needed humour. Howert’s delivery is so good that it instantly makes the sceptical best friend an audience favourite.

If I had to find one problem with this film though, it has to be the very end, which is a touch on the heavy handed side. While it may be considered a bit of a deus-ex machina, its issues are minimal, and after the suspense of the films climax it does come as somewhat of a welcome relief.

To conclude, Get Out is a near-perfect take on the horror genre, and will set Jordan Peele up for a strong, and prosperous directorial career, while also being remembered as a true modern classic in the genre.

I rate this film: 9/10

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